Low Frequency Hearing Loss – What is it and What Causes It?

Most loss of hearing follows a standard pattern. As the person gets older, they lose the ability to hear the higher frequencies. By the time most people reach their mid-twenties, they can’t hear the highest pitched sounds that teenagers can hear anymore. Women and children become harder to understand than men. This is high frequency hearing loss — the most common loss of hearing and the form most hearing aids are designed for.

But what about the people whose loss is the exact opposite of this? The people that can hear women better than men and can’t hear the roar of machinery that bothers most sufferers? These people have low frequency hearing loss.

You can probably already tell that it’s uncommon. There are only a few things that bring about this condition.

The first and most common cause is Meniere’s Disease. It’s a rare condition caused by a weakening of the membrane in the ear, and in addition to low frequency hearing loss, it causes episodes of vertigo, uncontrollable falling down, nausea, ringing in the ears, and feeling that the ears are blocked up. Sufferers of this disease usually feel exhausted after these episodes. The low frequency hearing loss is one of the milder symptoms of this disease.

The second is genetic factors. Low frequency loss of hearing often runs in families, and many people with it can trace it several generations back. People with the genetic form usually start losing their ability to hearing lower frequencies in childhood. In many ways children with this form of hearing loss are more fortunate than those with others, since all the sounds needed for normal speech are audible, and they can learn to talk normally without the need for speech therapy.

The third possible cause is childhood illness. In some instances, diseases such as Measles and the Chicken Pox can lead to low frequency hearing loss, though this is very, very rare. The advent of vaccines for such diseases is making it even rarer.

People unable to hear low frequencies have different sounds causing them problems than the average high frequency sufferer. As said earlier, men will be more difficult to understand than women. In addition, consonant sounds are slightly higher-pitched than vowel sounds, and so they’re easier to hear. Thunder, car engines, appliances, and other machinery are often difficult to hear or inaudible. Traffic noises are also hard, which is one of the dangers of this form of hearing loss.

Source by Barbara Owens

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5 Reasons Little White Bumps Are On Your Face and How to Get Rid Of Them

Are you making these mistakes each time you spot a little white little bump on your face? Fixing those little white bumps starts with a small dose of education and ends with a big dose of prevention. After understanding the five reasons below, your little bumps should give way to clearer skin.

Reason #1: You have no clue what those little white bumps are anyway.

Little white bumps, or milia, are keratin-filled cysts, or simply little globs of protein under the skin. There are generally two types of milia. Primary milia may result from oil glands that have not fully or properly developed. Secondary milia result from trauma to the skin.

Reason #2: You think all little white bumps are acne, and treat them that way.

Just because you have little white bumps on your face does not necessarily mean that you have acne. Milia, are little balls of protein beneath the skin that do not have a pore, or hole in the skin through which to escape.

Comedones or whiteheads are excess fats and wastes that are trapped in a hair follicle and so they clog up the pore. In short, milia are proteins trapped within the skin, while comedones are fats and skin debris trapped within the pore.

Exfoliating the skin, or removing the dead skin cells from your skin with an abrasive product or chemical, is beneficial. But brutally scrubbing your face with soaps and chemicals too frequently may actually create milia. To avoid this, remember that gentle exfoliation helps prevent excess dead skin cell build-up that could clog your pores and cause whiteheads, not milia.

This gentle exfoliation helps make eventual removal of the milia easier because the skin layer around the milia becomes thinner, with frequent, yet gentle exfoliation. In short, Exfoliate your skin to prevent milia, not to cure them.

Reason # 3 You have no idea what causes those little white bumps anyway.

When you were a baby, you were probably covered with milia that disappear after a few days. Or, you may have inherited milia from your parents.

On the other hand, you may develop milia after excessive exposure to the sun. The reasons for developing milia after sun exposure are debatable. According to some studies, the active ingredients sunscreens like Parsol 1789 may cause sun allergies and later lead to a milia breakout. Other studies blame the sun itself for “damaging” the skin can thus causing little white bumps.

Some people experience milia around the mouth. This could be the result of fluoride irritation from toothpaste.

Reason # 4: No one ever told you how to prevent milia.

The best way to prevent milia is to avoid treating your skin with excessively harsh chemicals and to limit sun exposure.

To reduce creating milia around the eyes, use eye creams with the least amount of ingredients possible to avoid irritating the delicately thin eye area. Also, gently touch the eyes and avoid rubbing the eyes vigorously so as not to damage the skin.

When brushing you teeth, try to keep the pasty foam from staying around your mouth too long. This limits possible fluoride irritation to the skin.

Use a sunscreen with the least amount of ingredients. Extraneous ingredients like fragrances may irritate your skin. Additionally, purchase sunscreens that offer physical sun blockage that contain active ingredients like titanium oxide or zinc oxide.

Reason #5: You still want to know what you can do right now to get rid of milia.

The key to getting rid of milia is realizing that they have no escape route, those little bumps are trapped under the skin. So, to get them out, you’ll need to have a professional like a dermatologist or aesthetician extract them. You can extract the milia yourself, but this involves risks.

Precautions

You need to ensure that you milia are not symptoms of some underlying disease or illness. Also, if you extract the milia yourself, you may have trouble completely pulling out the cysts, as the removable process may prove too painful.

Otherwise, if you are confident with your health and courage, you can cleanse your hands and face. Then wet a cloth with warm water and apply it to your face for a few minutes. Gently apply a sterile needle to the center of the little white bump to create a tiny opening in the skin.

Wrap your thumbs in a clean tissue and, using your thumbs, proceed to gently squeeze the contents of the little white bump out. Finally, cleanse the area of the extracted little white bump with an astringent.

Now, you have no reason to walk around with little white bumps on your face. If you still think you do, please consider the possibility that you’re just telling yourself little white bumpy lies.

Source by Naweko San-Joyz

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Silly String – How to Easily Eliminate the Stress and Mess

Virtually everyone loves silly string and practically everyone enjoys using a can or ten when it comes to parties, pranks, and wars. Though it is one of the most popular and widely used party supplies, it can also become an instant mess and hassle to clean up. Sure it’s fun while it’s happening, but when cleanup time comes and guests go home, you are stuck with hours of picking silly string out of carpet, upholstery and other hard to clean areas.

Because of the fun there really isn’t much of an option to not use it. The brightly colored stuff usually makes the whole party just take off into action. The best option is to learn how to make the can of fun easy and fast to clean up and avoid any damage it may cause. Because the bright colors have a small potential to cause damage, I have also created a list of items and area’s to avoid when using it.

Places it is safe to use: Silly string is generally easy to pull off clothing and other articles, though it can be more difficult to get it out of tight knit sweaters, as compared to 100% percent cotton items. So be sure that your clothing isn’t your best dress. It also helps to use it out doors. Yes it does come out of almost everything and isn’t as hard to cleanup as it may appear when it’s all around the room, but trying to clean up after several cans can add up to a lot of time, and can become very tedious work. Enjoy using silly string by simply avoiding any unpleasant cleanups. The best option is to use it outdoors where a water hose can easily be reached to the area. Silly string will dissolve by simply wetting it down, eliminating the long and boring cleanup after the entertainment.

Places to avoid using it: Most areas are safe and quite fun to use silly string, but there are some precautions that can prevent unwanted messes, injuries, or other problems. Keep in mind that if you are going to be using the brightly colored stuff at a public place, such as a park, you will need to make sure that such a location will allow you to use the string. Some parks ban any kind of party confetti and any other small particles that can get left behind, and this can of fun may be on their list. So be sure to check with the land lord or caretaker before bringing it. Never spray toward or directly into the face. Though silly string is generally safe it can cause damage if sprayed directly into any part of the face. The last but not least is to avoid areas where there may be vehicles present. Silly string is known to take off the surface of some auto body paints.

Taking these few precautions before using a can of bright string can make your experience enjoyable and a lot less stressful when it comes to cleanup.

Source by Mary Setter

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